Drought

Oroville

Drought 2021

Conserve Today for Water Tomorrow

Severe drought is threatening water resources in California and across the Southwest. With conditions worsening and considerable uncertainty about how long this drought will last, Metropolitan has declared a Water Supply Alert across its 5,200 square-mile service area to urge the region to conserve water and preserve Southern California’s valuable storage reserves. The action is aligned to Metropolitan’s One Water approach that calls on all of us to work together to reduce our water use, maximize available supplies and innovate new ways to adapt to drought and climate change. Because of past investments in our water infrastructure, sound planning and a conservation ethic that has become a way of life, our region is well prepared for this drought. But we are one state when it comes to managing this challenge, supporting Gov. Newsom’s call for Californians to voluntarily reduce their water use and investing in long-term water resilience.

Investments in Infrastructure = Dividends in Reliability

Sound Planning

Sound Planning

We are prepared for this year’s dry conditions thanks to sound planning and major investments by water agencies.  Anticipating extreme weather due to climate change has made us more resilient.

Conservation

Conservation

Conserving water has become a way of life for Southern California with demand dropping by almost 20 percent despite a 30 percent increase in population since 1990.

Infrastructure & Innovation

Infrastructure & Innovation

We are planning for future droughts and steps to address climate change by modernizing existing water systems and investing in new, innovative and sustainable projects.

Investments in Sound Planning

Metropolitan and our member agencies operate with one eye on today and the other on tomorrow. We undertake extensive and collaborative planning efforts that include our Integrated Water Resources Plan, Capital Investment Plan, Water Surplus and Drought Management Plan, Urban Water Management Plan and Climate Action Plan among others. Together, these plans anticipate myriad scenarios and analyze the needs and demands of the region. They provide a blueprint for prioritizing projects and programs to meet intended targets that make the region more resilient to drought and climate change. Our storage reserves tell one story of the value of our investments and planning.  With sound planning and conservation, we have accumulated a record amount of water stored in our network of reservoirs and groundwater banks to help us weather the extreme dry conditions we face this year.

Storage graphic

Investments in Conservation

Southern California has done a lot to reduce its water use over the past three decades, and especially since the last drought. Metropolitan has invested more than $1.5 billion in conservation, recycling and groundwater recovery programs since 1990. We encourage reduced water use to help ensure demand for water remains moderate and manageable. This approach has been highly successful, even in the face of significant population growth. Continued progress in this area means switching to more efficient appliances, swapping lawns for more sustainable native landscapes, and making small, everyday changes that add up to big savings over time.

Visit bewaterwise.com for more information on water-saving rebates, native landscape classes and inspiration, as well as helpful tips on what you can do to conserve even more.

Population growth graphic

Investments in Infrastructure & Innovation

Our facilities and infrastructure are at the core of our operations and ability to ensure safe, clean and reliable water supplies for our homes and businesses. Years of investment has allowed us to increase the flexibility and resilience of our water system, ensuring we are prepared for this and future droughts. We must continue this approach to tackle climate change and the many challenges we will face in the future by building, repairing, maintaining and upgrading pipelines and canals, pumping and water treatment facilities and other essential infrastructure. The region must also develop new, local water supply projects, such as Metropolitan’s Regional Recycled Water Program, which will provide a new, drought-proof source of water for Southern California. Additional state and federal funding may become available to help us better respond to the western drought crisis, promote water efficiency and environmental sustainability, develop local water supplies, improve water quality and allow us to modernize and innovate with new projects that help the region stay prepared.

Continuing Our Conservation Progress

Southern California has done a lot to reduce its water use over the past three decades, and especially since the last drought. That ethic must continue for the region to withstand this drought, future droughts, and all of the challenges climate change will bring. That means continuing to switch to more efficient appliances, swapping lawns for more sustainable native landscapes, and making small, everyday changes that add up to big savings over time.

Visit bewaterwise.com for information on water-saving rebates, native landscape classes and inspiration, and helpful tips on what you can do to conserve even more.

Garden 32 North Hollywood